Thursday, June 14, 2012

Richard Linklater's Bernie

Last night, I saw Richard Linklater's film, Bernie, featuring Jack Black in the title role as the assistant director of a funeral home in a small Texas town. Bernie is eccentric but well-loved, especially by the little old ladies whose late husbands' funerals Bernie organizes. This eventually develops into an odd relationship with one particular widow, a wealthy but mean old lady like by apparently no one else in town.

Bernie is an strange mix of comedy and drama, and based on a true story, though I knew nothing about the actual events, and was taken quite by surprise by a turn of events about halfway through the film. The advertisements and reviews describe it plainly, indicating that it is not considered a "spoiler," but I shall not reveal it here, because I enjoyed discovering these events as they unfolded, and hope that someone else might derive the same enjoyment by going into the movie blind.

What I will describe is Jack Black's incredible performance, which is like nothing else he's ever done. He has created a unique character in Bernie, and utterly disappears into the role. Bernie is loved by his neighbors, and viewers will have no trouble understanding why. He is kind, gentle, and sympathetic. Jack Black is really a joy to watch in this movie.

Bernie also stars Shirley MacLaine and Matthew McConaughey. The latter plays one of many townspeople who talk about Bernie directly to the camera in a series of interviews. I believe, however, that most or all off the other interviewees are actual townspeople. It strikes me as odd to juxtapose real townspeople's recollection of events with those of an actor playing a role, but it works well within the movie.

Bernie is funny and a joy to watch, not least of all because of Jack Black's performance. I greatly enjoyed it and would recommend it to almost anyone.

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